The Frost Is All Over

The Culture Magazine, Sunday Times 20 December 2015 If the cover portrait looks forbiddingly icy, rest assured that the melodies have a cosily warm core.  One of the most intimate folk singers, Rusby has assembled a soft-focus amalgam of carols and traditional songs with the emphasis on her native Yorkshire as well as deepest Cornwall.  Discreetly reharmonised, the more familiar materials acquires fresh hues, and the brass embellishments scattered here and there add depth.  She ends her Christmas tour tonight, but if you missed her, this set is one sure way of making amends.   CD ................................................................................................................................................................................................ The Independent 18 December 2015 Few performers are as inspired by Christmas as Kate Rusby.  On this third seasonal album, she embraces the culture of "strange" carols in Cornwall - noteably on Cornish Wassailing, a jaunty drinking song following the theme of hard-up merrymakers poncing booze off the better-off.  With guitar and accordion supported by cheery brass, it's typical of the charm experienced elsewhere in songs like Yorkshire Merry Christmas and Cold Winter, where grudges are set aside for fireside fellowship.   Andy Gill ............................................................................................................................................................................................... The Daily Telegraph 12 December 2015 A stocking full of kitsch and all that glitters ★★★★★ Wrapped in heart-warming brass and accordion, folk singer Rusby delivers a crystalline version of the Elizabethan Cold Winter on her third album of seasonal folk music, including a banjo-decked version of the Cornish Dilly Carol and a swinging take on Winter Wonderland . The title track is a lovely, original winter love song with blunt, Yorkshire warmth and a thoughtful undertow of quavering melancholy, Rusby's voice is the perfect accompaniment to dark December dawns.   ................................................................................................................................................................................................ The Guadian 10 December 2015 Kate Rusby remains Britain’s most popular female folk singer in part because she has mastered the art of Christmas songs. She is currently on tour promoting this new Christmas album, which follows on from Sweet Bells and While Mortals Sleep by providing a cheerful reminder that Christmas is part of the folk tradition. Once again, she revives songs that are performed in seasonal sing-alongs in pubs in Yorkshire (with Cornish songs now added in), and treats them with her distinctively pure, intimate and understated vocals. She doesn’t stray far from her vocal comfort zone, but variety is provided by classy backing including a five-piece brass section, accordion, and the guitar and banjo work of her partner, Damien O’Kane. The songs include new versions of Christmas carols, a gently jazzy Winter Wonderland, and one Rusby composition, the cheerfully contented title track. A safe and tested format, maybe, but it still works. Robin Denselow ................................................................................................................................................................................................. The Arts Desk 9 December 2015 It Ain't Christmas Without Kate
Tim Cumming
............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ The Observer December 2015 If it's Christmas, Kate Rusby will be found singing, either on tour or with a new album of Yuletide songs.  This third Christmas album follows the same pattern as While Mortals Sleep and Sweet Bells, featuring carols recast with folk tunes, well-worn standards and overlooked nuggets.  Hence Hark the Herald Angels emerges as Little Bilberry amid a warm wash of brass band, Cold Winter is a retrieved Elizabethan piece and Cornish Wassailing evokes Christmas in the South-West.  Rusby's tremulous vocals make for a winning bundle of secular and sacred, and the self-written track, though candied could become a fixture on the tree.   Neil Spencer ............................................................................................................................................................................................... Sunday Express December 2015 ★★★★ The Barnsley-born folk singer has become synonymous with compelling Christmas albums and this collection of carols and traditional songs is a fine addition.  The robust, attacking style of tracks such as Bradfield is balanced by gentler tunes such as her reworking of Hark the Herald on the lovely Bilberry.  The Perfect accompaniment to a mince pie and a glass of port.   ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ The Shropshire Star December 2015 8/10 Kate Rusby and Christmas go together like turkey and cranberry sauce, so here we have her third festive album - and it's another joyous celebration.  Cold Winter is classic Rusby, a catchy chorus that allows her soft vocals to warm the cockles.  The Christmas Goose is her jolly tall-tale about a lothario who gets more than he bargained for when ordering his goose.  She saves the best for last with self-penned title track, ethereal love song The Frost is All Over.  Old fans will relish this and new fans will find a very refreshing change from the Christmas soundtrack norm. Kate Whiting  
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